Higher Intake Of Fatty Acid Linked With Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

Higher Intake Of Fatty Acid Linked With Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

Higher Intake Of Fatty Acid Linked With Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

There may be a possible link between high levels of fatty acid intake in a diet and the likelihood of being diagnosed with prostate cancer according to the latest research.

SABOR Study Figures Used For Prostate Cancer Research 

The new research, which pulled data from a decade’s worth of info from the San Antonio Biomarkers of Risk (SABOR) study, found that high levels of specific fatty acids in the diet correlated with higher chances of a prostate cancer diagnosis. The study followed 1903 men from 2000 to 2010; 229 of those men would come to be diagnosed with prostate cancer.

While the study examined the role that all fatty acids might play in higher risk, there was one clear culprit: stearic acid. Increasing stearic acid intake resulted in a 23% increase per quintile that a patient would be diagnosed with prostate cancer. Overall fatty acid and fat intake figures per progressive quintile increased risks rates by 21%, 19%, 15%, and 11% respectively.

Good News with Bad News

Identifying how increased intake of stearic acid and other fatty acids or fats can increase your chances of being diagnosed with prostate cancer is certainly a mixed bag. A cancer diagnosis is, of course, bad news, but knowing what you can do to avoid such a diagnosis is certainly good. Considering how there are many things you can’t control when it comes to your chances of getting prostate cancer, such as your genetics, being able to exert some control over your environment is a positive trait.

Additional good news about the study comes in the fact that everyone’s favorite fatty acids were not found to be associated with increased risk of diagnosis. That’s right, omega-3 fatty acids are still on the approved list. In fact, there were no polyunsaturated fatty acids found to be associated with a higher chance of being diagnosed with prostate cancer. Meanwhile, reducing your intake of foods that act as high sources of stearic acid, which occur in many cooking fats such as butter margarine may also affect your chances of being diagnosed.

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